Taurine in Congestive Heart Failure

…“Taurine is a ubiquitous amino acid found across the animal kingdom. It is a sulfur-containing amino acid, found in high concentration in the intracellular compartment of excitable tissue, including the myocardium. It functions as an intracellular osmolyte, involved in cell volume regulation. Being a neutral zwitterion, transport of taurine is not accompanied by a change in charge gradient across membranes. This chemical property makes taurine the perfect candidate of cellular osmoregulation. Taurine also regulates sodium and calcium homeostasis, and normal functioning of mitochondria. It has demonstrated ionotropic effects, probably due to its effect on calcium metabolism. Several clinical trials have shown that taurine supplementation improves cardiac performance in those suffering from congestive heart failure. Given its extensive safety profile, taurine supplementation may be beneficial in patients with congestive heart failure.”…

Paper at;

https://clinmedjournals.org/articles/ijcc/international-journal-of-clinical-cardiology-ijcc-8-246.php?jid=ijcc

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Taurine is an excellent amino acid to take for anti-aging purposes. This is just one more positive aspect. I take 6 g daily.

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Can you direct me to documentation that supports 6g/day?

I’ve been taking 2g/day. The bottle that I have says take up to 3g/day.

Thank you!

This describes the 6 g protocol.

As medicine, taurine has most often been used by adults in doses of 6 grams by mouth daily for up to one year.

This is a list of different studies done on taurine and the dosages used.

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Review

“The potential health benefits of taurine in cardiovascular disease”

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“Taurine and cardiac disease: state of the art and perspectives”

https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/full/10.1139/cjpp-2019-0313?rfr_dat=cr_pub++0pubmed&url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org

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This is fantastic!

Thank you!

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Fantastic!

Thank you!!!

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For what it’s worth, Peter Attia has a different perspective:

They’re comparing a legit therapeutic dose of taurine (3g) to a minuscule dose of CoQ10 (30mg), so I’m not surprised by the results.