Dr. Morgan Levine Confirms Rapamycin Reduces Biological Age as Measured by their Epigenetic Clocks

In the new Translating Aging Podcast interview with Dr. Morgan Levine of Yale (currently transitioning to Altos Labs), she confirms that they are seeing reductions in biological clock measurements in animal cells when using rapamycin. This is important because there was one past study where in use of rapamycin in marmosets and with one specific epigenetic clocks (there are many out there being tested) they did not see a change in the biological age as measured by that clock.

She says:

“We can see see that rapamycin does decrease the epigenetic clock in cells. And I think that this was also shown by Ken Raj, and Steve Horvath in one of their in vitro analysis, so yes, the things that we see affect aging in an animal do show effects when using the epigenetic clocks”

But - it still sounds like we need good clinical data on this at the organism / animal level in addition to the cell level. We are getting some good anecdotal reports of significant epigenetic / biological age reductions with rapamycin, but we still need good clinical studies on this. And there still needs to be much validation of that these biological aging clocks truly map to lifespans of animals to a high degree.

In December Dr. Levine also tweeted this out:

The discussion starts at approximately the 10 minute mark on the podcast:

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Slowing or reversal?

“she confirms that they are seeing reductions in biological clock measurements in animal cells when using rapamycin.”

Alex - have you done any blood tests or biological age calculations pre or post rapamycin?