Can drinking LOTS of water (esp filtered for microplastics) help detox your body?

Detox it from heavy metals, pesticides, air pollution, and microplastics?

I’ve seen no evidence for that, and there is danger of dying by drinking too much water:

On the evening before her death, she began compulsively drinking water in vast quantities, estimated at between 30 and 40 glasses, and this was interspersed with episodes of vomiting. She became hysterical and also distressed, shouting that she had not drunk enough water. She declined medical attention but continued to drink water after she had gone to bed. She later fell asleep and died some time later.

Strange drank nearly two gallons of water in over three hours on Jan. 12, 2007. During the contest, she could be heard complaining about pain to disc jockeys at 107.9

3 Likes

For heavy metals you need chelation, and even then it takes about 20 sessions to do anything. It comes out in micrograms. Without chelation there is almost none in the urine, so I think you would mostly be losing electrolytes etc. that you might need.

3 Likes

How does one filter water from microplastics?

1 Like

Yes, I was listening to a podcast where an ER tech was mentioning that ever since the 6 glasses of water rule became popular, they had to deal with a lot more water poisoning cases (hyponatremia). You can drink too much water!

3 Likes

Reverse Osmosis will work, but it takes out minerals that you need, so if you care enough about your health to take out the plastic, should add back in the minerals. Also this is weird because the RO filter is made of plastic.

Reverse osmosis throws away a large portion of the water because it cleans the filter as you go washing things too small to go through off the side. So if you are in a place where water costs a lot or is scarce this is a bad thing to get.

3 Likes

Thanks Phred. Any sense how worried we should be about that?

Thinking whether my family should look into such a system.

No, I just thought is was funny. I don’t think the filter will put anything into the water. I don’t worry too much about being poisoned. In my experience feeding animals for most of my life, most health problems come from not enough of a nutrient. Bodies are pretty good at getting rid of the bad stuff. I say this after finding out I have high lead levels and chelation improves all cause mortality.

I don’t know whether we should be worried about plastic or not. Levels are high already and it doesn’t seem to be doing anything. It’s a shame and I throw away plastic things I find in the kitchen all the time (including all the tupperware) but I think if your water is clean you should leave it alone.

2 Likes

I’d not be surprised if filtering water is less healthy than just leaving it as it is. Who knows what unknown factors are introduced, like quality of filters, bacteria growth in filters, etc.

3 Likes

There is clear evidence that fluoride in drinking water is no bueno.

2 Likes

Looks like SGLT2 inhibitors could do your microplastic detox: SGLT2 inhibition ameliorates nano plastics-induced premature endothelial senescence and dysfunction 2023.

4 Likes

I recently got a RO system because I want to take out the fluoride as I’m pregnant. It comes with a remineralization last step so it’s all good in the end. It does “waste” a lot of water but that’s not an issue to me.

Thanks. May I ask:

What’s system did you go for / were there any other ones that you closely considered

Does it have any plastic parts the way @Bicep mentioned above

I have Woder Gen 4 dual under the sink system, which filters 95% of fluoride in municipally treated water besides other stuff. Then I additionally filter that water through an Epic filter that removes 99.9% of fluoride besides other particles.

1 Like

I got this exact product but paid $250 on AliExpress. Only the water tank is plastic — the carafe where the purified water gets output is glass. No concerns there, works pretty well but smallish batches.

Bluevua RO100ROPOT Reverse Osmosis System Countertop Water Filter, 4 Stage Purification, Counter RO Filtration, 2:1 Pure to Drain, Purified Tap Water, Portable Water Purifier for Home https://a.co/d/4zIIeKR

1 Like

Consumer reports on water filters…

2 Likes

I have to wonder why people remove fluoride added to water. In Australia it’s routinely added. Since that started (decades ago) the rate of dental caries (tooth decay) has plummeted. Tooth decay is the thin end of an oral hygiene wedge that has many health ramifications later on in life.

2 Likes

I can only speak for myself. I don’t dispute that fluoride helps with tooth remineralization. My concerns are twofold: 1) recent studies showing neural toxicity in a dose dependent manner without a lower threshold, so I have no reason to feel confident it’s safe in the amounts added to water — corroborated by the observational studies in Mexico linking fluoride concentration in an inverse relationship to children’s IQ 2) its mild antiseptic effect on nitric acid cycle bacteria in the mouth—I’m trying to make endogenous NO production a priority so removing fluoride would be low hanging fruit.

Still there’s the benefit of tooth remineralization I didn’t have a good alternative for until recently. But now we have toothpaste with nano hydroxyapatite whose only downside is higher cost. There’s also the excellent one with Biomin that as I understand acts a bit differently but with the same result of remineralizing teeth without fluoride.

Besides reverse osmosis removes microplastics.

2 Likes

According to the web search results from Bing, there is no evidence that fluoride added to local water supplies in the United States causes any health problems, aside from the occasional mild case of dental fluorosis, which is a cosmetic condition that affects the appearance of the teeth⁴. Fluoride added to drinking water is safe and provides a public health benefit³. The U.S. Public Health Service recommends a level of 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water, which is the optimal concentration for preventing cavities without causing adverse effects¹.

However, some studies have suggested that high levels of fluoride exposure may be associated with certain health risks, such as lower IQ, thyroid dysfunction, bone fractures, and cancer¹. These studies are often based on populations that consume water with naturally high fluoride levels, which can exceed 10 milligrams per liter, or use fluoride-containing products such as toothpaste, mouthwash, or supplements¹⁴. Therefore, the relevance of these findings to the U.S. population that consumes water with fluoridated levels is unclear and requires further research¹.

Source: Conversation with Bing, 1/30/2024
(1) What Is Fluoride? Uses, Benefits, Side Effects, and Safety - Healthline. What Is Fluoride? Uses, Benefits, Side Effects, and Safety.
(2) Fluoride added to drinking water is safe and beneficial. https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/oct/21/instagram-posts/fluoride-added-drinking-water-safe-and-beneficial/.
(3) Is Fluoridated Drinking Water Safe? | Harvard Public Health Magazine … Is Fluoridated Drinking Water Safe? | Harvard Public Health Magazine | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
(4) Is Fluoridated Drinking Water Safe? | Harvard Public Health Magazine … Is Fluoridated Drinking Water Safe? | Harvard Public Health Magazine | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
(5) Four myths about water fluoridation and why they’re wrong. Four myths about water fluoridation and why they’re wrong.
(6) Fluoride added to drinking water is safe and beneficial. https://www.politifact.com/factchecks/2021/oct/21/instagram-posts/fluoride-added-drinking-water-safe-and-beneficial/.
(7) What Is Fluoride? Uses, Benefits, Side Effects, and Safety - Healthline. What Is Fluoride? Uses, Benefits, Side Effects, and Safety.
(8) Getty Images. Getty Images.

3 Likes

Epic water filters also remove 99% of microplastic by two types of filtration, ionic exchange and activated carbon.

1 Like