Rapamycin Eye Drops for "Dry Eye" syndrome?

If I’m going to spontaneously combust so be it - but it’s really helpful to read all the various and varying effects that people feel.

Does anyone (other that Agetron :slight_smile: )have any long term oral effects that dentists/periodontists have noticed?

What about dry eyes - I have bad dry eye issues for years, I wonder if oral Rapamycin will help. Have been reading about drops, but by the time those are available otc or even through eye doctors mine may have turned to dust.

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Are you talking about rapamycin eye drops? No research on this at all yet - but I have seen people here talk about trying this DIY. I recommend doing some research (on Pubmed) to see if you can find any past papers that might touch on this, as I’ve not run across it before.

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I saw this a while ago. I’m not really able to understand it of course, I’m a fiction writer not at all a scientist.

Rapamycin Eyedrops Increased CD4+Foxp3+ Cells and Prevented Goblet Cell Loss in the Aged Ocular Surface

Dry eye disease (DED), one of the most prevalent conditions among the elderly, is a chronic inflammatory disorder that disrupts tear film stability and causes ocular surface damage. Aged C57BL/6J mice spontaneously develop DED. Rapamycin is a potent immunosuppressant that prolongs the lifespan of several species. Here, we compared the effects of daily instillation of eyedrops containing rapamycin or empty micelles for three months on the aged mice. Tear cytokine/chemokine profile showed a pronounced increase in vascular endothelial cell growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and a trend towards decreased concentration of Interferon gamma (IFN)-γ in rapamycin-treated groups. A significant decrease in inflammatory markers in the lacrimal gland was also evident (IFN-γ , IL-12 , CIITA and Ctss ); this was accompanied by slightly diminished Unc-51 Like Autophagy Activating Kinase 1 (ULK1 ) transcripts. In the lacrimal gland and draining lymph nodes, we also observed a significant increase in the CD45+CD4+Foxp3+ cells in the rapamycin-treated mice. More importantly, rapamycin eyedrops increased conjunctival goblet cell density and area compared to the empty micelles. Taken together, evidence from these studies indicates that topical rapamycin has therapeutic efficacy for age-associated ocular surface inflammation and goblet cell loss and opens the venue for new investigations on its role in the aging process of the eye.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7727717/

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Good find! This would seem to suggest its worth a try, if you have this issue.

Dry eye syndrome is a common eye disease.[3] It affects 5–34% of people to some degree depending on the population looked at.[5] Among older people it affects up to 70%.[10] In China it affects about 17% of people.[11] The phrase “keratoconjunctivitis sicca” means “dryness of the cornea and conjunctiva” in Latin[12]

Actually dry eyes lead me to Rapamycin. (3 things: periodontal issues, dry eyes, dodgy knees. And all three came up with Rapamycin and here I am, experimentally drugging. Rapamycin is literally the only thing I take aside from D because deficient, and creatine which I’ve stopped because youall seem to think the combination is iffy.)

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How actually to get legit Rapamycin eye drops ?

You would have to get a doctor to review the research (so pull as much of it together that you can, you can use Sci-Hub - Wikipedia to find the actual papers, if they are behind a paywall). https://www.sci-hub.st

Then, I would guess that if the doctor agreed with your research, they could identify a compounding pharmacy and have it made for you.

Your best luck would probably be starting with a doctor that is already familiar with rapamycin, from our list: Rapamycin Prescription, Doctors that Prescribe It

Contact one that is licensed in your state, and explain the situation…

Or do a variation of the DIY rapamycin skin cream DIY Rapamycin skin cream

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If you find this, do let me know! I have dry eyes, too. They aren’t bothersome, but they stop me from wearing contacts…. But hey, perhaps rapamycin is going to fix my vision :slight_smile:

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I’m not a pharmacist but I noticed at work that one of the patients had liquid sirolimus (had a g-tube due to inability to swallow) so it would seem like that form might be handy for topicals. I’m not sure about the inactive ingredients in it or if it would be something that could safely go into the eyes though. I’d love to do it myself though.
I found this:

Ingredients in the rapamune solution from page 23:
image

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Wow thanks. I will read and then try to get the eye doctor lady I go to to read these. She seems receptive but who knows. As I write my right eye is inflamed and swollen on the surface. I have the usual drops they prescribe but it’s getting more frequent … I was hoping oral Rapamycin would reach my eyes,and maybe it still will im not on it long enough. But drops would be fantastic - for those who have dry eye disease - it would be a life changer.

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Sorry for the off-topic response. I had dry scratchy eyes for almost a year (one was usually worse than the other), then took a tablespoon of flax oil once a day for two weeks, and my eyes have been OK ever since with very rare and short-duration exceptions. That happened to me in in my late 40s. Am 70 now.

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For sure I’m going to try this - easy enough and why not! Thank you.

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I wouldn’t experiment with the eyes. There are some rare cases of HSV keratits that could lead to blindness with topical immunosuppressants. PCPs are quick to refer to ophthalmologists with any of eye issues for a reason.

What is wrong with topical cyclosporine for dry eyes ? It’s well established, relatively safe and efficacious. Ophthalmologists prescribe them all the time.

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Flax oil has many benefits and very little down side. You can get it with or without the polyphenols and I think there are phytoestrogens in there too. So don’t OD, but otherwise this is harmless.

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BTW, we have 12 year old King Charles Cavalier and this breed tends to suffer from keratoconjunctivitis. At 12 she’s pretty old and it did affect her right eye. I had her on oral rapamycin at 3 mg per week (she’s about ten kilo - big for cavalier) based on Kaeberlein’s 0.1 mg per kg given 3x weekly with food for about 3 months.
By my rough estimation there is about 30-40 % improvement in the swelling, redness and eye discharge in the period of those 3 months, but it took good several weeks for some improvement to appear. She also seems to be more active and mobile (balance on her hind legs to get food).
This is just my case study, although the dog is also on her zesty paws supplements, taurine and Sulforaphane (she has a vet. clinical diagnosis of an abdominal tumor by XR and palpation - seems to be stable).

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This is good to hear. I came to rapamycin because of dry eye disease, periodontal issues, and osteoarthritis. (To read these things you’d think “falling apart” - it sounds much worse than it feels or looks, but I’m not waiting for it to get too bad). I’ve only just had my first 5 mg dose this week, I’ll update as time passes. I’d take this from rapamycin if I had to choose just one thing : dry eye sucks. I’ll go get zesty paws also :paw_prints: just in case :slight_smile:

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