New Branded Topical Rapamycin Gel for Skin (angiofibromas/tuberus sclerosis)

Hyftor possibly available in August. Maybe pricing next month?

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Rapamycin definitely has improved my skin tone and has dramatically repaired my sun damaged skin. However, it doesn’t seem to be countering the effects of gravity so much.

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DesertShores, do you mean through weekly dosing or through topical cream application?

Weekly dosing. I have not yet decided to put any on my skin.

I am using .05% RAPA cream. (mixed 10.5 mg rapa with Cetaphil cream for 200 grams mixture. 2 weeks now, and seem to see some results. Will send trials, that show the cream lightens the age spots, but more important in trials it actually reversed the collagen loss in the skin. Collagen loss makes skin wrinkle and sag. Will continue with this experiment for another 3 months and see what results I get if any. Some people are using .10%, but this .05% is Dr. Greens formula.

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How often do you apply it? I use a similar concentration and apply nightly to face and hands.

I apply twice a day. All over head, face, hands, and lower arm. Then go back and apply extra to specific spots. Also massage specific areas where I have sagging skin. Will continue twice a day until I get any possible side effects. i.e. rash, etc. Good Luck.

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Would love to see some before/after pics of user selected topical regions!

This study provides before and after pictures of a low dose rapamycin application to the skin.

This is one study referenced in Mikhail V. Blagosklonny’s paper. *1

Two interesting takeaways for me:
One, “A notable aspect of this study is the use of such a low dose of rapamycin (10 μM, or 0.001%) for topical application.” The results look quite remarkable to me for such a low dose.
“We chose to use rapamycin at a ten-fold lower dose because the concentrations used in TSC patients are intended to inhibit cell growth,” “The positive impact of our treatment regimen suggests that age-related therapy with rapamycin may be feasible at doses far below those associated with side effects”

Two, apparently they used DMSO as the carrier and could detect rapamycin in the blood at even this low of a dose. “Participants enrolled in the study were provided with a container of rapamycin cream and a container of placebo (DMSO)” They were also able to measure rapamycin in the whole blood at this low dosage.

I personally plan to make and use rapamycin in DMSO as a carrier. What is preventing me now is that I don’t have a source of pure rapamycin.
DMSO is the only carrier that is relatively safe that I know of that will carry rapamycin deep into the tissue but must be used with caution as it will also take any contaminants deep into the skin and possibly the bloodstream.

*1
Topical rapamycin reduces markers of senescence and aging in human skin: an exploratory, prospective, randomized trial

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Do you have a link to Dr. Alan Green’s rapamycin cream forumula? I’m interested in how he does it. I’m also a little confused about your formula. Please correct me on what I’m doing wrong here. I divided 10.5 mg by 200 grams by converting the 200 grams to milligrams first which gives the formula (10.5 mg / 200,000 mg). That calculation gave me (10.5 / 200000) which gave me 0.0000525 (0.00525%) instead of .05% .

Sorry my mistake. Should be 45mg rapa per 100 grams of cream = .045% so 90mg rapa for 200 grams Cetaphil,

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https://rapamycintherapy.com/ You have to go down a few pages to find the Rapa cream formula

I’d use transcutol rather than DMSO as the carrier. DMSO will carry the molecule all the way through the skin (as evidenced by increased blood levels of rapa) whereas transcutol allows penetration into the skin but is more likely to keep it there where we want it. Also, transcutol is proven safe and approved for use in skin products (unlike DMSO), and bonus no garlicky breath.

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I’m convinced. It also solves the problem of having to use pure rapamycin as you would with DMSO to avoid contaminates getting into the blood.

Here is a very interesting study testing Transcutol® as a carrier.
Transcutol, a solvent that can increase drug solubility by orders of magnitude compared to other topically applied pharmaceutical solvents

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I just bought a lifetime supply from https://labproinc.com/

Transcutol® is the trade name for Diethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether.

Diethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether, 99%,500 ML - 15931
1 $15.94

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OOPS, after accepting my order, I received this email response from LabPro:

“Thank you for your order, I am reaching out to inform you we needed to cancel your order # 2829 due to the nature of this chemical. Lab Pro will not be able to ship to a residential address. It must be a business address that is licensed to accept, store and safely remove the reagents.”

Has anyone found a reliable source other than eBay, that will ship to a residential address?

You don’t need to order from a lab. I got mine from lotioncrafter.com

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Thanks, you made my day. Their prices are very reasonable.
I know you posted this source earlier, but it didn’t register.

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