If you get your Rapamycin without a presciption, do you tell your GP?

I’m curious whether folks here who get Rapamycin without a prescription tell their regular GPs about it. I don’t like the idea of being on a medication without it appearing on my medical records in case it’s relevant in some emergency; on the other hand, I also don’t like the idea of disclosing to a GP who’s likely to disapprove of me taking a prescription drug without a doctor’s supervision/approval. What do you think?

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I would think that it has to do with how open-minded and up-to-date your GP is.
Personally, I mentioned this to my then cardiologist and he immediately blew a fuze and dropped me as a patient. I know I can’t discuss this with my GP because I already know his attitude towards other supplements.

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I would not discuss it with my GP or any of my specialists. Does it bother me? Yes! On one hand, they should be more open-minded. On the other hand, I do understand them: they are trying to avoid high liability situations. They cannot approve that you take non-prescribed medication. This means we are on our own.

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I got rapa with a prescription but not from my normal HCP. But I told her and it’s on my medical record.

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Yeah, mine is no-prescription, and my GP is quite conservative. It makes me a bit uncomfortable, but I think I’ll keep it to myself. Thanks for sharing your stories! It would be interesting to find out whether Rapamycin has any significant contra-indications when combined with common emergency-use medications…

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The hospital where I get my check ups just jots it down under medications I am taking. They may ask why I am taking it, but never give me a hard time. My GP doesn’t even know what Sirolimus is. He thought it was an antibiotic but gave me a prescription for it anyway after I told him it wasn’t. I only use my GP to get prescriptions and to get medicine for common illnesses. He’s pretty good with those. I think he doesn’t want to give me a hard time as his English is quite poor and I tell him my doctors back home prescribe it for me. One of the perks of being a foreigner here.

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Makes me think of the Coneheads :sweat_smile:

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I told my cardiologist but he already knew I had been to RAADfest. I told him that rap is thought to delay/prevent heart disease, cancer, and alzheimer’s and I’m too old to wait anymore. He didn’t say a word. I also told a GP and my dermatologist recently. Maybe I’ve been lucky but it’s my experience that these guys are curious about what I’m doing. It does seem that I am the first patient who’s told them of my self experimentation with rapamycin.

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No they wouldn’t understand as an anecdote I can tell you last year I told my girlfriend I was considering taking rapamycin for longevity. "Are you crazy, taking an immunosuppressant during the pandemic? " So I explained to her that in low intermittent doses rapamycin actually enhances the immune system. Then she remembered she had heard about that before and had actually published a paper about the immune enhancing effects of everolimus for her PhD thesis 15 years earlier…

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One reason I am hesitant to tell my GP is that having it on my medical record could be used against me on an insurance claim

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Oh! That is a very good point that I hadn’t considered. Thanks for bringing it up.

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I had to tell them, otherwise some of the results on my bloodtest would be very alarming. Cholesterol & Glucose.
Maybe you guys don’t have that side effect: my cholesterol is at 280 and my glucose level was border line pre-diabetes.

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Do you take an anti-diabetic drug and/or statins to counteract those changes in cholesterol and glucose levels?
Makes me realise I really should get my blood work done soon - albeit I started an anti-diabetic drug not long after starting Rapamycin.

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Those are alarming numbers. How long have you been taking rapamycin? I would quit immediately if that happens to me. I tell all of my doctors that I’m taking rapamycin. iOS 16 has a neat way to display them all. So I will probably just flash my phone to the next doctor.

It also has a pretty neat system of flagging drug interactions.

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I’m in process of adjusting my dose to check for any impact. But yes, i have to consider the risks.

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I am in the UK. I have an NHS GP and a private GP. My private GP would not prescribe Rapamycin so I got it from abroad. I did not ask the NHS GP because I don’t want to invest the many hours on the phone it takes to get any sensible response from the local GP practice. However, it would be sensible to tell any medical practitioner of supplements and rapamycin usage.

If you get a legit prescription, is it tracked in a database other people can see? I’ve had a lot of Covid shots, and I’m surprised I can find other vaccine records when I search. If I get prescrip. rapa, will other DRs know? If it’s out of state, is that different?

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Depends on the country and process.

I had to get a CT scan and a colonoscopy. I listed Metformin and Sirolimus as medications at my doctors appointment and checking in for the procedures. I got a lot of questions about Metformin but nothing about rapamycin. It wasn’t listed as a medication either time. They just assumed I made a mistake I guess.

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I’ve only been taking Rapamycin for 4 weeks. I hadn’t thought about disclosing it to my doctors until I saw mine recently. I hesitated, then decided not to for now. He’s pretty well informed and we often negotiate on my drugs and dosages so he respects my opinions and wishes but he would certainly add it to my medical record and I’m not sure that would be a good thing.

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