Consuming olive oil could reduce risk of dying from dementia by a third, study suggests

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I’ve taken couple spoons of EVOO each morning for a while now (i always skip breakfast btw) and I thought it was doing some good, nothing big. However, lately I added one garlic bulb crushed and minced into small pieces (don’t like to chew because it makes one smell all day long) and taken with olive oil each morning, and that remedy seems a BIG winner. Don’t know the modus operandi of it, but it seems to be fighting inflammation, as well as warding off cold and flu viruses. I intend to stick with this method for foreseeable future.

I intend to also add some fresh minced ginger to see if it will be even more effective in fighting inflammation.

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Allicin - garlic is an H2S donor helpful for mitogenisis.
Ginger has Gingerol which is an HDAC inhibitor. (there are quite a lot of HDAC inhibitors)

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Clearly, I had no clue what H2S and HDAC were but after googling them I think the positive effects I’m getting are backed by science also. Thanks for the info, I’ll keep doing it/what works.

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This timing may be breaking your fast / decreasing the benefit of intermittent fasting you may have been getting.

So perhaps consider moving the olive oil cocktail towards your first meal.

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Interesting take, and very valid point. now that you mentioned it, that is exactly what I’ll do. The only problem with that is the fact that I’ll have to do it at work as opposed to doing it first think in the morning.

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@John_Hemming A friend of mine suggested that I ad raw honey to the mix, but generally speaking I’m skeptical of anything sweet (even though I love sweets lol). My fear is honey would nullify some of the positives of garlic, ginger, and EVOO? what do you think?

Honey has a reasonably good reputation, but I personally don’t eat it. I would think it is quite high in calories. However, if you want something sweet and have the calorie budget for it then it is a good candidate.

I don’t know about whether “raw” honey has any risk elements to it.

Royal Jelly is interesting because it is a substance that has clear epigenetic effects, but IMO you would need to eat a lot to have an obvious effect. It contains another HDAC inhibitor, however, but a very weak one.

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[quote=“John_Hemming, post:8, topic:8752”]
I don’t know about whether “raw” honey has any risk elements to it.

Thanks for the input.

Well actually I’m an expert on this one(raw honey as my father was a beekeeper). Honey other than RAW is not really honey. So, for honey to have any positives effect it MUST be raw. It is beyond me that they pasteurize honey making it into one of worst foods in grocery stores. Unpasteurized/raw honey does have some anti-microbial benefits plus it provides beneficial enzymes, but it is loaded calories (as rightly noted) and carbs/sugar. If you are skinny (have no weight issue) no harm done just good (if you consume raw honey in moderation), but trying to lose weight it will be real hard. As for the store bought one/pasteurized it is as bad as corn syrup. Pasteurization kills everything beneficial and turns it into very unhealthy product.

BTW, my question was more to do with the facts that it might interfere the H2S donor of garlic and the HDAC inhibition capabilities of ginger?

Hard to say. It needs an analysis of the contents.

I have a shot of EVOO every day. I mix in different powders to increase their bioavailability. Every morning I add 1 g of NMN, Apigening, black pepper, tumeric, and hyaluronic acid and mix them all together. 3X a week I also add resveratrol powder. It makes for a bioavailable cocktail in the morning.

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They found that those who consumed more than half a tablespoon of olive oil each day had a 28 per cent lower risk of dying from dementia compared with those who never or rarely ate olive oil.

That is such a wild result for such a small amount of olive oil. You almost never see such a large effect when it comes to anything nutrition related.

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