Antiaging Effects of Alkaline Water in Mice

Control mice drinking regular water were compared to mice drinking alkaline water after ten months. Water pH 9.0.

Highlights:

  • “We found reduced ROS levels and increased SOD-1, GSH, telomerase activity and telomeres length in alkaline supplemented mice.”
  • “We show here that watering by using alkaline water supplementation highly improves aging at the molecular level.”
  • “In fact, we show that AWS induced a 3-fold increase of both telomerase activity into the blood and telomeres length in the bone marrow and ovaries of treated mice.”

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Logozzi M, Mizzoni D, Di Raimo R, Andreotti M, Macchia D, Spada M, Fais S. In vivo antiaging effects of alkaline water supplementation. J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2020 Dec;35(1):657-664. doi: 10.1080/14756366.2020.1733547. PMID: 32106720; PMCID: PMC7054916.

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Full text.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14756366.2020.1733547

AlkaWater® consists of boric acid, distilled water, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium hydroxide, sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium selenite.

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Thank you, most interesting.

There is an argument that because cells deacetylate the histone to become slightly alkaline if they are acidic, that it is best to aim for slightly alkaline inputs.

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I have just ordered a batch of 200 liters of 8.5PH water to try. Let’s see if it makes a difference. I will try for 3-6 months.

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I take so much alkaline material (mainly citrate) that my urine at times ends up as pH 9. It is obviously an issue as to what is in the alkaline water. It will be interesting to hear back on your experiences.

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Would something like this do the job? (I’ve been using it for the past few months because my fiancée likes its taste, but if you now tell me it has longevity benefits… :slight_smile: )

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If I remember correctly, there was a guy in the US (born in Poland?). I forgot his name. He had a PhD I think. At the age of 79 he got interested in life extension. I think he read the Pearson & Shaw book. He passed on a few years ago aged 111 I think. I believe he’s the only person ever recorded who set out to be a Supercentenarian and actually succeeded.
Point I’m trying to make is I remember he was keen on alkaline water.

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The body works to keep cells very slightly alkaline. I think ph 7.4 in the main although some areas are acidic. Ph ends up being maintained via the urine in the main so urinary ph shows what work the body is doing. I was for a while monitoring this. I know mine normally is quite alkaline, but when drinking it goes slightly acidic. I think the gener evidence points to alkaline being best, but what is used to influence ph matters.

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You’ll most likely would be able to notice a difference (if any) in 10- 20 years, but doubt you’ll feel a difference for 3-6 months only.

I could not find a source for AlkaWater®. AlkaWater® consists of boric acid, distilled water, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium hydroxide, sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium selenite.

One of the most popular alkaline water contains:

Purified water (by reverse osmosis), sodium bicarbonate, dipotassium phosphate, magnesium sulfate and calcium chloride, electrolytes (for taste)

It doesn’t state the quantities.

You can of course buy alkaline water drops or tablets to make your own. Presumably saving money over the alkaline bottled waters.

The ingredients of one (AkaZone):

Deionized water,tripotassium phosphate, potassium bicarbonate,potassium hydroxide,sodium hydroxide,magnesium chloride,calcium chloride

Often studies use odd or non-popular brands for their studies. I find this unhelpful.

Since there are no comparative studies of water containing different ingredients to raise ph is any other alkaline water as good? Are we only looking to raise ph?

I can’t find any definitive evidence that any particular ingredients to raise the water ph is any better than another. Here are the ingredients used in one human study:

Whole foods sells alkaline water for 99 cents a gallon (for those that want to try). I will give it a try myself. That is not too bad considering I see 750ml bottles of alkaline water for $2.99 in other grocery stores.

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It is quite cheap to buy litmus paper strips and you can use those to track urinary pH for a while. It is worth checking this before aiming to consume more alkaline food or drink (or supplements).

There are also guides as to which foodstuffs tend to make the body more acidic or more alkaline.

In the end the body will adjust back, but the process of adjustment will have effects.

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After looking at that table, I can see that I probably need to drink alkaline water to offset the highly acidic content of my diet.

Litmus papers are really cheap. This is something worth testing. I was surprised when I found that my urine was more alkaline than the alkaline water (when I am not drinking), but I am not drinking it myself and don’t suggest anyone else does.

After reading the paper I used lab quality pH full range 0-14 to test my mid-day urine
It was the same pH as my distilled water, 7. Since this is neutral despite my acidic diet do you think there is any benefit for me drinking alkaline water?

I would test it at various stages during the day (it does vary), but it does not sound as if pH is an issue for you. It may be that you would benefit from being more alkaline, but I am not sure that there is evidence for this.

I am quite happy being at pH 9 (when not drinking), but I don’t know of any evidence that argues for a pH more than 7.

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Thoughts from anyone on hydrogen water? I’m thinking of buying one of these new water bottles that you put tap water in and push a button to infuse hydrogen into it.

We discussed that in the thread below:

It started as a thread about hydrogen gas, but it later evolved to one about hydrogen rich water.

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